Posts Tagged ‘isacs conference’

A few months late, but I wanted to share:
My booklist of trans young adult and children’s literature from the 2013 ISACS conference

In November, I presented at the ISACS (Independent Schools Association of the Central States) conference in St. Louis about trans young adult literature.

ISACS is an association of midwestern independent schools (which is sort of a fancy way of saying private schools, but there is a bit of a distinction), and I was invited to speak at their annual conference this past November about trans young adult literature as well as ways of teaching trans literature in the classroom.

My presentation was a bit different from other presentations I have given on this subject, because I talked about some ideas for teaching trans literature in a middle school or high school setting, not just about young adult literature, which is typically my focus.

We read an excerpt from “A Roman Incident” by Red Durkin from The Collection: short fiction from the transgender vanguard during the workshop, and talked about some ways it could be used in a high school or middle school English class. Some of the teachers (and librarians) had some great ideas about how to use it! I think one of the most interesting ideas was talking about outsider identity–specifically, the fact that the girl in this story is a competitive eater is very clearly the distinct feature that makes her an outsider in this story, while her being trans is probably the least interesting (but nonetheless important) feature about her, and the teachers had some interesting ideas about ways that could lead into classroom discussion. As far as I’ve heard, a few of the teachers were considering or planning on using the story in their classrooms, although I have not gotten any reports back yet.

Anyway, it was interesting to talk to teachers, who are dealing with teens in a much different capacity than librarians, about this, and I think we had some great conversations. I had meant to post about this sooner, but better late than never, right?

[Please note that if you are a middle or high school teacher reading this, I do recommend A Roman Incident for classroom instruction. While that particular story is appropriate for middle and high school (and even younger, although younger kids might not get it) students, not every story in The Collection is, so please be sure, as with anything you give to your students, to read any stories you plan to recommend to your students.]

Advertisements